UI Retirees Association - Pictures & Videos

Pictures

A history refresher at Hoover Museum & Library

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More than 50 UIRA members spent much of the afternoon of April 4 learning about the operation and maintenance of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Museum and Library in West Branch, birthplace (on August 10, 1874) of the 31st President of the United States and a 15-minute drive from Iowa City.  The facility is one of 13 Presidential libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration.  


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Many of the attendees were familiar with the Museum-Library, but this was an opportunity to learn more about what takes place behind the exhibits of the Hoover Library-Museum as well as the dozen other Presidential libraries.  The UIRA paid each members’ $3 senior admission fee.


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Some members took the opportunity to sign up for Library-Museum programs, including joining the Presidential Library Association which sponsors such activities as visits to other Presidential libraries.  The Hoover Library-Museum is located on the grounds of the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site and is administered by the National Park Service.  


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Archivist Craig G. Wright discussed the development of Presidential libraries and how they came to be a public-private collaboration.  A critical point in the establishment of Presidential libraries occurred in 1978 with the Presidential Records Act.  The act changed the legal ownership of the official records of the President from private to public and established a new statutory structure under which Presidents must manage their record (source: http://www.archives.gov/presidential-libraries/laws/1978-act.html).  Precipitated in a controversy over President Nixon’s papers, the act took effect in 1981.


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After his presentation, Archivist Wright (right) continued the discussion with Professor-emeritus Jerry L. Rose.  Wright told the group that the Hoover facility underwent three phases: First, the Hoover papers were at Hoover’s alma mater, Stanford University.  Then, on August 10, 1962, the museum opened in West Branch.  Subsequently the Hoover papers, encompassing 8 million pages, covering 6,500 cubic feet and packed in 13,000 boxes, also found a home in West Branch.


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Preservation and security are the main concerns of Rollie Owens, Museum-Library facilities manager since 1999.   Owens spoke to the group about how the Museum-Library copes with such situations as storms that could threaten the facility and its contents.  One of the items that recently became part of his responsibility was looking after Lou Henry Hoover’s 1929 Fleetwood Cadillac Limousine Cabriolet.  The automobile unfortunately wasn’t part of the UIRA program since it was being prepared for public display as part of America’s First Ladies Exhibit April 19 to October 26.


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The group divided into three smaller groups to learn about the archival work performed at the facility.  In the archive library, Archivist Matt Schaefer spoke about the kinds of questions, some very specific, that crop up.  An example: Is there any correspondence between Will Rogers and President Hoover.  Sure enough, Schaefer produced a file with a letter on stationery from the Hotel Martinique in New York City dated February 7, 1930, from Rogers with the salutation “My Dear Herb.”


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In his remarks, Archivist Schaefer mentioned—and held up—a copy of The Daily Iowan dated August 10, 1954.  The headline across the top of page 1: “Iowa to Honor Hoover Today.”   It was the occasion of President’s Hoover 80th birthday.  Two UIRA members in the audience, Dwight and Pat Jensen, were more than a little interested--Dwight was editor of the student newspaper at the time and wrote the lead story for the day, and Pat was news editor. 


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And here's the front page of that Daily Iowan.


The color of healthy living: Blue

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The UIRA focused on improving health with what it hopes will become an annual program on the Blue Zones Project—a national effort to enhance emotional, physical and social health by transforming the local environments in which people live, work and play.  Snacks, the healthy kind, were available at the program attended by 42 retirees March 26 at the Coralville Public Library.


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More than a dozen organizations associated with healthier living took part, distributing information and sponsoring door prizes.  The Blue Zones Project is the centerpiece of Iowa’s goal to become the healthiest state by 2016.  


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Speaking to the group was Iowa City’s Blue Zones Engagement Leader Faithanne Molyneaux. As a demonstration site, Iowa City is one of a number of cities working to achieve Blue Zones Certification.   The first Iowa cities to become Blue Zones demonstration sites, in May 2012, were Cedar Falls, Mason City, Spencer and Waterloo.  


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The Blue Zone concept refers to identifying a demographic and/or geographic area of the world where people live longer than elsewhere and then trying to implement practices believed to contribute to longevity.  The idea is explored in a book by Dan Buettner, "The Blue Zones: The Blue Zone: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest.”

 


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Among the participants was the University of Iowa’s Wellness Center.
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And the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center. 
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And Running Wild, along with ISU Extension, Friendship Yoga, Iowa City Cohousing, Bicyclists of Iowa City, Iowa City Parks & Recreation, New Pioneer Food Coop, Village to Village and Wellmark. 
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Leading Iowa City’s efforts to become Blue Zones certified are the Chamber of Commerce, ACT, Mercy, the University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City Community School District, United Way, the cities of Coralville, Iowa City and North Liberty, Hy-Vee and University of Iowa Hospitals.  Much more information about the Blue Zones Project is available at several websites,  including iowa.bluezonesproject.com/ and iowa.bluezonesproject.com/communities/iowa-city.


FilmScene scores hit with UIRA

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On a day when temperatures were in the single digits, about 75 retirees went to the movies.  The attraction was a visit February 27 to Iowa City’s new and only downtown theater, FilmScene.  Andy Brodie, one of the co-founders of the nonprofit theater, welcomed the group.     


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Any visit to the movies, of course, requires a stop at the concession stand.


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Is there a more iconic, Iowa-born film star than Marion Morrison?  Yes, if he changes his name to John Wayne and becomes a Hollywood giant.  Born in Winterset, Wayne (1907-79) starred in 142 films.  FilmScene’s lobby features a life-size cardboard cutout of Wayne, providing a natural photo-op.  


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UIRA Program Committee member Nancy Lynch introduced Brodie, who founded FilmScene with Andrew Sherburne.  The theater opened in December 2013.  


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Brodie told the group that the theater was an effort “to reclaim a little of Iowa City’s film history.”  A writer, filmmaker and film programmer/promoter, Brodie studied film at the UI, where he served as programming director of the Bijou Theater, which has partnered with FilmScene.


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Describing the theater’s purpose, Brodie quoted from its mission statement: “FilmScene is a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing the cultural vitality of the Iowa City area through the presentation and discussion of film as an art form.” 


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Appreciating movies is what the visit was all about, and with the Oscars then only two days away, UIRA members were treated to a viewing of several Oscar-Nominated Live Action Short Films.  This image is from a Japanese entry, “Possessions,” in which old artifacts come alive and vex the living.  


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Another short, from Ireland, titled “The Missing Scarf,” was a child’s-like story of a squirrel, Albert, searching for a missing scarf by asking animals where it might be.  Albert discovers that other animals are also missing things, like this polar bear who has lost his habitat.  The narrator is George Takei.


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And of course there had to be a love story, “The Blue Umbrella,” a USA entry.  The blue umbrella spies a glamorous red umbrella, falls for her (it?) but then gets blown away into a drain, emerging later to be reunited with his (its?) rain-splattered paramour, or, if you prefer, parasol.


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FilmScene is located on the Ped Mall at 118 E. College St., formerly occupied by Vito’s restaurant.  More information about FilmScene, including membership in the organization and its Founders Circle, can be found at: www.icfilmscene.org/


'Libraries not going away': John Culshaw

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The cafe may not have been open—it was between semesters—but there was still much “food for thought” during a UIRA program at the UI Main Library Jan. 14, 2014. The topic: the future of libraries with a focus on changes at the UI.


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Head Librarian John Culshaw expressed optimism about the future of libraries. “Libraries are not going away,” he said. Culshaw, who came to Iowa in August 2013 from the University of Colorado, told about changes in the Library resulting from the library’s recent $14 million renovation. 


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Culshaw explained features of the room in which a standing-room crowd of 60 gathered. It is one of several TILE rooms. The letters stand for Transform, Interact, Learn and Engage. The room has five round tables with nine seats at each, three computers, microphones for class discussion, flat screens and walls that can serve as blackboards.


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Library staff led visitors on a tour of the renovation. The new Learning Commons features numerous computers, television screens, a central information desk, a number of meeting rooms and, of course, the “Food for Thought Cafe.” “Remember when you couldn’t even bring in a cup of coffee,” someone commented.


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As part of the first-floor renovation, a new library entrance was created on the east side of the first floor—along Madison Street, site of a bus stop. Culshaw said he thinks about libraries as a three-legged stool—Collections, Space and Services. 


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Part of the Commons includes a series of television monitors. Pointing to the Library’s popularity, Culshaw said during December, 2013, a total of 113,000 persons came into the Library.


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Books are still an important part of the Library operation. On the fifth floor is an extensive Conservation Lab, which rebinds and refurbishes valuable books. This photo shows small books created for decorative purposes by staff members.


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Conservator Giselle Simón (right) explains what’s involved in producing a book.


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Attendees were able to handle the books (above). Unusual books also were displayed. The book shown in the lower image above is a German children’s book (Das Sprechende Bilderbuch), printed in 1800. It has little string pulls on the side which, when pulled, emit barnyard animal sounds from squeaky toy mechanisms hidden in the “text block.”  


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Anatomy of a book--A framed illustration of the parts of a book hangs on the wall in the Conservation Lab.


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Tools for rebinding and restoring books require high tech of a different nature, such as these presses. Beth Stone (right), a graduate student in the UI Center for the Book, explains the restoration process. The Center has been working on Czech and Slovak Museum materials recovered from the flood in Cedar Rapids.


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Attendees showed keen interest in book restoration and rebinding. The Library doesn’t offer conservation services to the public but makes a list of vendors available, several of whom are located in Iowa City.

 


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Walls in many of the rooms on the first floor also serve as a blackboard.  You can write wherever you want—except in certain places, as noted in this announcement posted on a door: “DO NOT WRITE ON THE WINDOWS.” 


Music echoing the Holocaust

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Nearly 50 persons attended a presentation for UIRA of “Music from Exile” by the highly-acclaimed Daedalus Quartet Nov. 14 in the Recital Hall of the University Capitol Centre (UCC) in downtown Iowa City.  


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Beth Oakes, University strings lecturer, introduced the Daedalus Quartet, noting that the group was in Iowa City as part of the UI School of Music’s week-long artist-in-residency program.  During the visit, the Quartet made several appearances in the community and on campus.  


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“Music from Exile” featured works by four composers.  Two of them died in concentration camps, and two escaped.  Erwin Schulhoff died in a concentration camp.  Viktor Ullmann was taken to Theresienstadt and later was killed in a gas chamber.  Mieczslaw Weinberg fled to the Soviet Union, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold went to the US where he gained prominence in Hollywood composing film scores.  


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Members of the Quartet, founded 11 years ago, are (left to right) Min-Young Kim and Matilda Kaul on violins, Jessica Thompson on viola and Thomas Kraines on cello. The group has performed around the world and are quartet-in-residence at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.


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Jessica Thompson—viola; Thomas Kraines—cello.
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For the UIRA, the Quartet performed excerpts from works by each of the four composers.  A formal presentation by the group of “Music from Exile” took place on campus the afternoon of Nov. 17.


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Each member of the quartet spoke briefly about the life of one of the exiled composers.  Speaking here is Ms. Kaul.  


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Ms. Thompson also spoke about one of the composers.  


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Daedalus members responded to questions from the audience.   Much of the discussion focused on the concentration camp located northwest of Prague, Theresienstadt, as it was known by the Nazis.  Built in the 18th century, the fortress town was known as Terezín.   


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Several members of the audience had visited the camp, now home to the Museum of the Terezín Ghetto.  Held up to the world by Hitler as a kind of model community, Theresienstadt became a place to send notable musicians, writers and artists.  The deception worked for a long time.  Documented sources, however, show that Terezín became a way station for 200,000 men, women and children sent to other camps and probably to death.  


David Osterberg on Iowa's water challenges

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More than 30 persons heard environmental activist David Osterberg of the Iowa Policy Project (IPP) discuss challenges facing the state of Iowa in achieving higher levels of water quality Oct. 23 at the Coralville Public Library.  Osterberg, co-founder of the bipartisan IPP (http://www.iowapolicyproject.org/) and a former state senator, is a professor in the UI Dept. of Occupational and Environmental Health.  He is an expert on water resources management and agricultural economics.


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Relying heavily on research by himself and others, Osterberg said agriculture was the chief culprit in polluting Iowa waterways.  As a result, Iowa and several other states contribute a disproportionate share of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Gulf.  Changing farm practices—such as terraces and conservation tillage and conservation buffers—can help reduce the problem, as shown in this photo of farm land in Woodbury County in northwest Iowa.


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Among those in attendance were several members of the League of Voters.  The UIRA Board has agreed to invite to UIRA meetings other groups that might have a special interest in a particular program. 


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Osterberg points to a chart showing the progress—or lack of it—over the years in meeting the target of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to reduce “dead zones” (areas of low oxygen where marine life cannot thrive).  While there are occasional reductions, the dead zones have met the NOAA target of less than 2,000 square miles only once since 1990.


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Osterberg told the group that funding for conservation in Iowa has declined over the past 10 years.  A controversial issue is whether the state should assume an aggressive role in mandating agricultural conservatism—or whether the state can depend on voluntary endeavors.  Osterberg said the data “do not bode well for (a) volunteer system.”


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This chart illustrates the damage certain crops can do to the environment.  It shows corn and soybeans as primary sources of nutrients in the Gulf of Mexico, contributing 25% of the phosphorus and 52% of the nitrogen.  Excessive amounts of nutrients can lead to more serious problems, such as low levels of oxygen in the water.


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Osterberg responded to numerous questions from the audience, including: How much Iowa corn is used for ethanol?  About 40%.  He also spoke briefly about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) citing of Iowa regulators for non-compliance with the Clean Water Act, including an inadequate inspection program and failing to assess adequate fines for violators. The EPA and Iowa’s Dept. of Natural Resources are currently negotiating an agreement to bring Iowa into compliance.


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Nancy Williams (left) and Nancy Lynch had a few more questions for Osterberg after his presentation and took the opportunity to thank him on behalf of UIRA.

 


“Retirees (are) a very important resource,” says UI President Mason

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UI President Mason spoke to nearly 100 persons attending the President’s Reception for the UIRA Oct. 10 at the Levitt Center for University Advancement.


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With collective centuries of service to the University in the Wyrick Rotunda, President Mason said she found retirees “invaluable” for the historical perspective and experience they bring as she and the University face future challenges and opportunities.


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President Mason commended those present, adding, “I hope and believe that the UI remains in your orbit of service, that your continued affiliation with us means that you have honored us with your desire to remain a part of the life of the university for a long time to come.”  Her complete remarks can be found at

http://www.uiowa.edu/~uira/pdf/president-sally-mason-speech-to-uira-2013-10.pdf


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The afternoon reception afforded retirees an opportunity to visit among themselves as well as with other university officials, including Executive Vice President and Provost Barry P. Butler and Associate Provost for Faculty Tom Rice. 


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Nancy Williams, immediate past president of UIRA, visits with President Mason.


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In her remarks President Mason referred to the reception as the UIRA’s “kick-off” of the new year.


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Dwight Jensen (left), former editor of the UIRA newsletter, and Ken Starck, UIRA president-elect, chat.
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President Mason took the opportunity to talk personally with many retirees.


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The reception took place in the Wyrick Rotunda, named for retiree Darrell D. Wyrick, chief executive officer of the UI Foundation for 36 years, from 1962-98.  This view looks down on the rotunda from the second floor staircase.


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President Mason spoke about several major campus projects, including a new arts center necessitated by the flood of 2008.  Meanwhile, a few steps away, just southeast of where the reception was taking place, a wrecking ball continued destruction of Hancher Auditorium, a flood victim.  Work on a new auditorium just north of old Hancher is underway.


Where Art and Science Intersect

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Three-dimensional printing, along with beautiful art jewelry, highlighted visits by UIRA members Sept. 19 and 24, 2013, to M. C. Ginsberg: Objects of Art in downtown Iowa City. A total of about 50 retirees were shown pieces of art jewelry—the brooch, shown above, is only one of four in the world—and then introduced to 3-D printing by Mark Ginsberg, owner.  


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Retirees present for the Sept. 24 session listen intently as Mark Ginsberg (not visible, standing in stairwell) explains how he uses 3-D printing capability to combine his interests in jewelry and art with such science disciplines as engineering, biomedicine and physics.  
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Retirees attending the Sept. 19 session listen as Mark Ginsberg discusses how M. C. Ginsberg developed a boutique business, utilizing 3-D printing to create objects ranging from jewelry such as cuff links to human organs such as the heart.


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The second and third floors of M. C. Ginsberg house equipment to design products and to print them. Ginsberg (at far right) said there isn’t much difference between sculpting art objects and objects for science. The project shown on the screen involves recreating a rare death mask.


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On a large screen, Bounnak Thammavong demonstrates use of the computer to model products that can be printed on 3-D printers. 


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Examples of the variety of products printed at M. C. Ginsberg are (upper left and clockwise) a tray of jewelry items—some patterned after diseases; an adult heart—perhaps most fascinating of all the products; and a sprocket and crescent wrench—both fully functional.


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“Have a heart” is what Jonni Ellsworth seems to be saying after inspecting a 3-D-produced heart and passing it on to another retiree.


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Here is the model of the adult heart with two models of two-year-old children’s hearts. Such models of human organs help doctors prepare for complex surgeries.


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Mark Ginsberg tells the group about his prize 3-D printer (Objet Eden 350). Cost: $130,000. 3-D printers create objects from a variety of materials by adding one thin layer at a time until the object is fully formed.


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This is a look inside a second, smaller printer (T76+). Someone has compared 3-D printing to producing a loaf of bread by baking individual slices and then gluing them together. 3-D printing is an additive process, producing an object—the “loaf”—layer upon layer, slice upon slice.


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On an outdoor balcony, retirees deal with a bright sun as Ginsberg, who deserves the title of Renaissance man, continues the account of his efforts to wed art and science.


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Ginsberg purchased the business from his father in 1985. His daughter Lizzie works as a custom designer, the fifth generation of the Ginsberg family to be involved in the business. A hallmark of his business, Ginsberg said, was “institutionalizing your own brand by giving back to the community.”

 

 


Health and Purpose Keynote Big 10 Retirees Conference in Ann Arbor



Nearly 50 retirees representing 11 universities took part in the 22nd annual Big Ten Retirees Association Conference August 9-11, 2013 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. The opening reception took place outdoors in the Michigan League Garden.

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Theme for the conference was “Fostering a Healthy and Purposeful Retirement for Yourself and Your University Retiree Association Members.” The 19 registered delegates from the 11 universities: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Ohio State, Penn State and Purdue. Northwestern attended for the first time, while Wisconsin was not represented.
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The historic Michigan League served as the headquarters for the conference. The facility became a home away from home for University of Michigan women in the early 1900s. The University Alumnae Council raised funds for the League which was opened in 1929. Today the facility is a focal point of the campus, open to both men and women.
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The Burton Memorial Tower stands just northwest of the Michigan League. It honors Marion Leroy Burton, born, incidentally, in Brooklyn, Iowa, who served 1920-25 as fifth president of the University of Michigan. At the top of the clock tower is the 43-ton, 55-bell Charles Baird Carillon.
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Following the reception and dinner, Rebecca Dunkle, associate university librarian for the University of Michigan Library Operations, spoke about changes taking place in the modern libraries, such as adding coffee shops, printing books on demand, digital access to books, use of flash drives and even selling small conveniences such as refillable water bottles, ear buds, Post-it notes, etc.
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“New Lessons in Health and Wellbeing in Retirement” was the topic of Dr. Victor Strecher, professor and director for Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship, University of Michigan School of Public Health. He emphasized the importance of retiring with a purpose. He noted that the leading cause of death results from personal decisions people make. The nation, he pointed out, spends $2.8 trillion for health care with 70% of that going toward chronic disease management.
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Dr. Strecher is author of a forthcoming book titled “On Purpose.” It will be a graphic, cartoon-like book in keeping with his mission to communicate health information in new and effective ways across many different platforms. “We need to open walls we build around ourselves,” he said, “for example, liberals watching (Bill) O'Reilly and conservatives watching (Rachel) Maddow.” Other points: Purpose involves “pursuing ends that give our existence meaning;” factors contributing to happiness include sufficient sleep, mindfulness (i.e., prayer, meditation), activity, creativity and healthy eating.
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Retirees were introduced to a formula for happiness by Dr. Victor Katch, PhD, professor of Kinesiology and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Michigan. Speaking on “Searching for Happiness” Saturday morning, Dr. Katch posed this formula: H=B+C+L, where H=Enduring Happiness; B=Inherited traits (biological); C=conditions (of your life); and L=Lifestyle choice. Studies, he said, tend to show that B contributes about 50% to Enduring Happiness; C, about 10%; and L, about 40%.
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Dr. Katch, who studies relationships between physical activity (exercise), nutrition and weight control, said “Exercise is medicine. Moving is living.” He pointed to three kinds of happiness: The Pleasant Life, The Engaged Life and the Meaningful Life. Among the traits he said that distinguish people who use their personal strengths to serve others are compassion,  humility, authenticity, integrity, perseverance.
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A bus tour Saturday afternoon introduced retirees to Michigan's campus, covering more than 3,000 acres. The University enrolls 42,000 students. The football stadium, referred to as “the Big House,” is the largest in the country, seating 110,000, about the population of Ann Arbor.

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Representatives of each university spoke briefly about their association's mission statements and how their groups fostered “a purposeful and healthy life for its members.” Individuals discussed a wide range of topics: gaining access to pre-retirees to introduce them to the retiree association; cooperation – often the lack of it – from the university's central administration in promoting the interests of retirees; the formation of special interest groups within the association; the challenge of attracting new and young retirees.
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Among those reporting about campus retiree activity was Allan Richard Drebin of Northwestern University. This was the first year Northwestern has been represented at the Big 10 conference.
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Evening entertainment Saturday featured a musical program led by Bill Meyer (at the keyboard), a versatile professional and master of a wide variety of musical styles, from Fats Waller to Steve Allen. Accompanying him on drums was Shawn “Butter” Hawkins.

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Representing Iowa at the conference were Nancy Williams, immediate past-president of UIRA, and Ken Starck, president-elect of UIRA. Starck also represented Iowa's Emeritus Faculty Council.
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At his Saturday session Dr. Strecher had asked participants to complete a brief research instrument. He then reported on some of the results Sunday morning. In terms of core values, results for the group showed that relationships, kindness and responsibility were most highly regarded. The least important value for the group was expertise.
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Individual values change with aging, said Dr. Strecher, and being aware of this change is significant since values define purpose. Research shows that writing out values helps reduce defensiveness. Another helpful exercise, he added, was to consider what you'd like to see written on your headstone for others to see. “Each year becomes more valuable when we think about death.”

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The final session of the conference Sunday was a business meeting. The group approved a new webmaster for the Big 10 retirees website, Nancy Firestone (nancyf@umich.edu) of the University of Michigan, who replaces Fred Remley of the University of Michigan who had served as webmaster since the site was established. Conference Chair Pat Butler of Michigan also appointed a committee to study membership issues, including inviting Maryland and Rutgers retiree organizations to join the Big 10 group and to consider the possibility of replacing the name Big 10 with CIC (Committee on Institutional Cooperation), a consortium of the Big Ten universities plus the University of Chicago. Finally, Butler turned over the ceremonial gavel and yellow duck to incoming chair John Adams of Minnesota, which will be host to next year's Big 10 conference August 8-10, 2014. That conference will be followed immediately by the biennial conference of the Association of Retirement Organizations in Higher Education (AROHE), August 10-12, 2014, also at the University of Minnesota.


Neither floods nor gnats dampen retirees' annual picnic.

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Despite flooding in Iowa City that approached but fell short of 2008 levels and an early invasion of nettlesome insects, retirees enjoyed the UIRA's annual picnic June 4 in City Park. (Thanks to Nancy Lynch for the picnic photos in this album.)   


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Here's Shelter 6--where the picnic was scheduled to take place. It was moved to Shelter 3 in upper City Park. Still recovering from the effects of the 2008 flood, the University escaped severe damage this time with barrier systems being placed around campus.



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More than 50 persons braved the elements to enjoy a catered meal with potluck side dishes.




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Riverside Theatre Artistic Director Jody Hovland spoke to retirees about the 2013 season's programs. Plans for retirees to attend a rehearsal at the group's outdoor facility in lower City Park was out of the question. In fact, all of Riverside Theatre's 14th season of productions will take place in the West High School auditorium.


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The June picnic traditionally culminates UIRA's monthly programming activities for the year.


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A plate full.  


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A guest at the picnic was Susan Boyd (left).


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Outgoing UIRA President Nancy Williams welcomed the group.


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Ken Kunz, former UIRA president and incoming president of the Emeritus Faculty Council, took care of details for the picnic.


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Could they be discussing head gear?


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Rick and Laura Walton were among picnickers braving the elements. Rick is incoming UIRA president.


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Meanwhile, elsewhere in City Park, geese patrolled deep left field in ball park No. 3.  


Marathon Man: Circling the globe stride by stride

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From Boston to Athens, New Zealand to Antarctica, Kenya to Easter Island, add Omsk for good measure and you've covered all seven continents—just as Rick Walton has run marathons on all seven continents: North America, Europe, Oceania, Antarctica, Africa, South America and Asia. Walton's feat places him in the exclusive Seven Marathons Club—he became its 100th member. The Club now has about 400 members ( http://www.sevencontinentsclub.com/). Walton recounted his runs at the monthly meeting of UI retirees May 15, 2013, at the Coralville Public Library. (slides courtesy Rick Walton)



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In North America, Walton has run marathons in a number of cities, including Chicago, Boston (twice), New York, the Twin Cities, Duluth and Omaha. The Chicago run qualified him for Boston. Walton is professor emeritus, UI College of Dentistry. He will serve as UIRA president 2013-14.


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Walton ran the Boston Marathon, referred to as the “Grandaddy of them all,” in 1993 and 1997. Among his marathons in the US, he characterized Boston as the “most exciting” but also the “most difficult” because of carbohydrate depletion during his first run. In comparison, however, he said some international marathons were more difficult than Boston. His best Boston time was 3 hours, 55 minutes.     


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The New York Marathon, which Walton ran 20 years ago, remains his favorite. Here he is shown approaching the finish line in Central Park. He's in the center of the photo, number 8629.   

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In 1996 Walton participated in the 100th anniversary of the Athens Marathon. A year earlier he ran in the London Marathon. The Athens Marathon commemorates the run of the soldier Pheidippides from a battlefield at the site of the town of Marathon, Greece, to Athens in 490 B.C. Legend has it that Pheidippides delivered the message of victory, then collapsed and died. His run is said to have covered 24.85 miles (40,000 km). The Athens run covered 26.2 miles (slightly more than 42 km.), which is considered the official distance of the modern marathon.  


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On Jan. 1, 2000, Walton joined about 2,000 runners in this millennium's first marathon anywhere. The event took place in Hamilton, New Zealand, and added the continent of Oceania to Walton's running card. He described it as his “most exciting” international run but also the least interesting. He said it started in a drizzle and ended in a steam bath.   


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The most unusual—and probably most dizzying—of Walton's marathons took place Feb. 6, 2001, in Antarctica. That year the weather was so bad the 87 participants wound up running laps—422!—aboard the ship, the Lyubov Orlova. The sights were incredible, said Walton: seals, penguins, whales, skuas (a type of seabird), dolphins and orcas.  


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Walton's most difficult international marathon, the Safaricom in 2002, took place near the equator in northern Kenya at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. Walton said the run offered the 440 runners “incredible scenery” but also danger as rangers kept watch on the ground and in the air. It was Walton's slowest marathon at 5 hours, 10 minutes, yet he won his age group by 45 minutes. Safaricom combines running with fund raising which since the inaugural marathon in 2000 has raised $3.8 million to benefit schools, hospitals and conservation projects.


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Easter Island (Rapa Nui) provided Walton with what he described as his “most lonely and remote” marathon. The marathon took place on the Polynesian island in the southeastern Pacific Ocean in Rapa Nui National Park, Chile. The island is famous for its more than 800 monumental statues called “moai,” designated a UNESO World Heritage Site. It was Walton’s best finish ever—seventh overall.


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Asia was Walton's last of the seven continents. The Siberian International Marathon took him in 2004 to Omsk, once a major center for Russian exiles, including Dostoyevsky in 1849, and today a stop on the Trans-Siberian railway. The city of Omsk initiated the Siberian Marathon in 1990 when the city first opened to foreigners.   


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Walton happily celebrated completing the Siberian Marathon. He said said this was the easiest of his international marathons, probably due to the flat terrain and little traffic.


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The source of energy and stamina for all these marathons?


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Proof—a member of the Seven Continents Club! Dated August 7, 2004, the certificate reads: “This document certifies that the above participant successfully completed a marathon on all 7 continents.”



Annual business meeting features reports, elections, music

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More than 80 persons attended UIRA's annual business meeting and luncheon April 23, 2013, in the Kinnick Ballroom of the Holiday Inn Conference Center in Coralville. Besides reports from officers, the meeting included election of officers and a musical program. Minutes of the meeting can be found elsewhere at the UIRA website.



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UIRA President Nancy Williams thanked volunteers who have contributed to UIRA and reviewed the year's activities. She reported Iowa retirees were represented at meetings of the Big Ten Retirees Assn. and the Assn. of Retirement Organizations in Higher Education (AROHE). She noted joint activities of the UI Emeritus Faculty Council (EFC) and UIRA and said the two retiree groups have discussed merging. 


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In the audience were five past UIRA presidents: Kathie Belgum (2001-02), Karole Fuller (2006-07), Penny Hall (2009-10), Jean Hood (2010-11) and Dick Stevenson (2008-09).



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Gene Spaziani, chair of the Membership Committee, reported UIRA currently has 611 dues-paying members representing 542 households. While overall membership declined by about 6% compared to last year, the number of new members joining increased by 15%—to 120.



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UIRA Treasurer Joe Joynt reported figures for 2011-12: Income—$7,486; Expenses—$6,398; Balance at the beginning of the year—$19,569; Balance at the end of the fiscal year—$20,657.



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In reviewing UIRA's programming for the past year, President-elect Rick Walton described the monthly meetings as “a focal point” for UIRA. He characterized the year's programs as “very interesting, relevant and generally well-attended.” He later introduced today's program.



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Following lunch, UI Music Professor Stephen Swanson presented a medley of songs. A concert and opera singer as well as a teacher of singing and opera stage director, he has sung in opera houses in Switzerland, Germany, Austria and the Netherlands and has performed as a soloist with many of the world’s leading conductors. His accompanist was Casey Rafn.



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Professor Swanson has recorded several CDs, including “Animal Songs: Bestiaries in English, French & German” (Albany Records). “Animal Songs,” produced in collaboration with UI Professor David Gompper, includes a cycle of nine songs based on poetry by Iowa's first poet laureate, Marvin Bell.



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Joining UIRA President Nancy Williams and President-elect Rick Walton (center) was one of the founders of the association, Frank Cheng. Cheng is UI Professor Emeritus, having retired from the University in 1992.



Dr. Mallik on the Higgs boson, the "God" particle

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“What Has the Higgs (God) Particle to do with Anything” was the title of a presentation at a UIRA program March 29, 2013, by UI Physics and Astronomy Professor Usha Mallik. About 60 persons attended the program at the Coralville Public Library. Dr. Mallik is part of an international team specializing in experimental particle physics. (Slides in this album are courtesy of Dr. Mallik)


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Dr. Mallik explained how the Higgs boson fits into the theory of the universe. (Higgs derives its name from Scottish physicist Peter Higgs who helped explain how particles acquire different masses; boson refers to any of a class of elementary or composite particles.) This slide shows the hierarchy of things, from the largest (universe—top left) to the smallest (elementary particles—bottom left).


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The birth of the universe occurred as a result of the Big Bang occurring 13.8 billion years ago, said Dr. Mallik. In this slide, note the progression from right to left toward the Big Bang. Work by Edwin Hubble in 1929 significantly contributed toward understanding that the universe has been expanding, presumably from an initial explosion called the Big Bang.


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The era of particle physics came about when a change occurred producing matter in a “mist-like quark-gluon plasma,” shown in this slide as a familiar brand of popular soup. The image facing the can shows the transition took place during the period of the Big Bang. (See the tip of the cone in the preceding slide, “Birth of Our Universe.”)


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Dr. Mallik explained that the universe in its infancy went through an exponential expansion, growing extremely fast by several orders of magnitude. This slide illustrates the known ingredients in that “Primordial Soup Recipe.” The percentages, says Dr. Mallik, are approximate and subject to possible future measurements.


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On July 4, 2012, the world's press headlined the discovery of the Higgs boson. The announcement came from scientists at the Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest atom smasher at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists affirmed the discovery months later on the day marking Einstein's birth, March 14.


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Dr. Mallik said the ultimate goal is to understand what conditions after the Big Bang led to the universe as we know it today. This slide compares the discovery of Higgs boson to finding a needle in what looks like a haystack. But by no means is everything known, said Dr. Mallik. She suggested: “Stay tuned.”


Of water and sandbags and the Iowa Flood Center

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Iowa's efforts to combat flooding was the topic of a UIRA program March 6, 2013, at the Iowa City Public Library. About 30 retirees heard Professor Larry Weber, co-founder of the Iowa Flood Center and director of the University’s IIHR—Hydroscience & Engineering (formerly Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research). His topic: “A Critical Resource for all Iowans (and a model for the Nation?)”


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Professor Weber, originally from Dyersville, holds the UI's Edwin B. Green Chair in Hydraulics. The Iowa Flood Center was established in 2009 after the 2008 floods. Iowa's Legislature funded the Center with appropriations of $1.3 million each of its first three years. Its budget for fiscal year 2013 is $1.5 million.


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The Flood Center's parent organization, the IIHR—Hydroscience & Engineering, has 47 research engineers and scientists and 113 graduate students.  More than half of the students are international.  Part of a PowerPoint presentation, this slide illustrates the Center's cutting edge work through “incorporating computational simulations with laboratory modeling and field observational studies.”


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Professor Weber told retirees that the Flood Center works closely with numerous state and federal agencies. Iowa's model, he said, has the possibility of serving as a model for other states.


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Mapping state waterways represents a large part of Flood Center activity. This map shows the status of the Flood Plain Mapping Project. A myriad of Center maps are interactive and can be found at http://iowafloodcenter.org/\ and then by going to IFIS (Iowa Flood Information System).



Retirees tackle UI football facilities 101

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More than 100 UI retirees were guests of Hawkeye football Feb. 28, 2013. They toured new facilities and learned about future plans. Shown here is the Richard O. Jacobson Athletic Building which currently houses offices for football staff.


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The tour began inside the 102,000-square-foot indoor practice facility completed in fall 2012. The building has 45-foot high side walls and 65-foot clearance at the peak and the requisite 100-yard field.


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The building also serves other UI sports, including softball and baseball. Student athletes have ready access to the the facility. At the north end are three platforms for filming.


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UI retirees were able to inspect the building and get an up-close look at the turf, an artificial grass called FieldTurf. The building replaces the 27-year-old “Bubble,” which was deflated in April 2012.


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Host for the event was Dr. Jane C. Meyer (left). She was introduced by Kathie Belgum, UIRA past president. UI's Senior Associate Director of Athletics since 2001, Dr. Meyer oversees all intercollegiate athletics facilities projects and operations.


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Dr. Meyer said the practice facility was the first of a development program to keep UI competitive. The second phase—the Football Operations Facility—will connect to the practice facility. It will house coaches' offices and locker rooms with space for training, sports medicine and equipment.


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Football place kickers haven't been overlooked. Retractable fiber goalposts cling to the roof at each end of the indoor practice facility.


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Here's a close look at the FieldTurf. Fibers produced from rubber (inset) are made to replicate blades of grass.


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Student athletes gain entry to the practice facility using a fob or hand recognition system (shown in photo).


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During a sack lunch Dr. Meyer explained athletic funding. Programs operate on an annual $80 million budget with ticket sales, contributions and TV receipts each accounting for one-third. Big Ten teams share TV revenue equally. She noted no public funds go toward construction costs.


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Dr. Meyer showed retirees plans for the second phase of construction. Cost of the practice facility was $12.5 million. Total cost of the entire development program will be about $55 million.


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Retirees were able to view artist renderings of what will eventually emerge as the second phase of construction.


Retirees learn about "Alien Worlds" at meeting Jan. 17, 2013

UI Astronomy and Physics Professor Robert Mutel discussed the emerging field of astronomy Jan. 17 at the UI retirees
UI Astronomy and Physics Professor Robert Mutel discussed the emerging field of astronomy Jan. 17 at the UI retirees
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Professor Mutel is a pioneer in the use of remote astronomy for education and research. He discussed the history of extra-solar planets, what is known about development of life on earth and how this knowledge is being used to search for life on planets in the solar system and beyond.
Professor Mutel is a pioneer in the use of remote astronomy for education and research. He discussed the history of extra-solar planets, what is known about development of life on earth and how this knowledge is being used to search for life on planets in the solar system and beyond.
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Research utilizing new technology has enabled discovery of nearly 1,000 new planets orbiting stars beyond the sun.
Research utilizing new technology has enabled discovery of nearly 1,000 new planets orbiting stars beyond the sun.
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Professor Mutel, who came to the University of Iowa in 1975, has had a long and distinguished career in the field of astronomy. His research interests are mainly in radio astronomy with an emphasis in space physics and plasma astrophysics. And he is an ultra-cycling enthusiast, logging about 6,000 miles each of the past 15 years.
Professor Mutel, who came to the University of Iowa in 1975, has had a long and distinguished career in the field of astronomy. His research interests are mainly in radio astronomy with an emphasis in space physics and plasma astrophysics. And he is an ultra-cycling enthusiast, logging about 6,000 miles each of the past 15 years.
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Meeting Nov. 15, 2012, to Discuss UI Health Care Benefits

Richard Saunders and several members of the UI Human Resources Office discussed health care benefits for retirees at a meeting Nov. 15, 2012, at Parkview Church in Iowa City. Saunders is assistant vice president of HR and director of the UI Benefits Office.
Richard Saunders and several members of the UI Human Resources Office discussed health care benefits for retirees at a meeting Nov. 15, 2012, at Parkview Church in Iowa City. Saunders is assistant vice president of HR and director of the UI Benefits Office.
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Richard Saunders responding to questions raised at a meeting Nov. 15, 2012, of UI retirees.
Richard Saunders responding to questions raised at a meeting Nov. 15, 2012, of UI retirees.
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UI retirees participate in a discussion of UI Health Care Benefits Nov. 15, 2012.
UI retirees participate in a discussion of UI Health Care Benefits Nov. 15, 2012.
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Richard Saunders of UI answers a question for UI retirees at a UIRA meeting Nov. 15, 2012.
Richard Saunders of UI answers a question for UI retirees at a UIRA meeting Nov. 15, 2012.
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Touring Historic Johnson County Courthouse Sept. 27, 2012

Retirees toured the Johnson County Courthouse and jail in fall 2012 prior to a vote on a bond issue to establish a Justice Center.  The bond issue subsequently failed to get the required 60% voter approval.
Retirees toured the Johnson County Courthouse and jail in fall 2012 prior to a vote on a bond issue to establish a Justice Center. The bond issue subsequently failed to get the required 60% voter approval.
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Retirees saw crowded workstations in the Johnson County Courthouse, which was built 1899-1901.
Retirees saw crowded workstations in the Johnson County Courthouse, which was built 1899-1901.
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A dungeon in the Johnson County Courthouse? Not exactly--merely a basement for storing artifacts.
A dungeon in the Johnson County Courthouse? Not exactly--merely a basement for storing artifacts.
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Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness spoke to the retirees.
Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness spoke to the retirees.
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The third floor dome of the Johnson County Courthouse stands out for its brilliant colors.  The dome is made of art glass held together by lead.
The third floor dome of the Johnson County Courthouse stands out for its brilliant colors. The dome is made of art glass held together by lead.
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Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness discusses with retirees the need for a new Justice Center. A November bond issue failed to get the necessary 60% approval.
Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness discusses with retirees the need for a new Justice Center. A November bond issue failed to get the necessary 60% approval.
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Participating in the 10th annual meeting of the Big Ten Retirees Association

The meeting took place Aug. 3-5, 2012, at Ohio State U with the opening reception/dinner held at the residence of Ohio State President E. Gordon Gee.
The meeting took place Aug. 3-5, 2012, at Ohio State U with the opening reception/dinner held at the residence of Ohio State President E. Gordon Gee.
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In welcoming the group, President Gee told attendees that universities should “unretire' retirees.”
In welcoming the group, President Gee told attendees that universities should “unretire' retirees.”
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Ohio State's Marie Taris, who chaired the meeting, led introductions at the opening session Saturday morning.
Ohio State's Marie Taris, who chaired the meeting, led introductions at the opening session Saturday morning.
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A welcome was extended by David Green, associate vice president of OSU's Human Resources.
A welcome was extended by David Green, associate vice president of OSU's Human Resources.
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Topic of the first panel was “Enhancing Membership.” L to R: Jack Goebel, U of Nebraska; Jerry Hull, Michigan State U; and Marie Taris of Ohio State U.
Topic of the first panel was “Enhancing Membership.” L to R: Jack Goebel, U of Nebraska; Jerry Hull, Michigan State U; and Marie Taris of Ohio State U.
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The second panel discussed “Programming—What Works?” L to R: Judy Craig, U of Wisconsin-Madison; Pat Butler, U of Michigan; and Diane Selby, Ohio State U.
The second panel discussed “Programming—What Works?” L to R: Judy Craig, U of Wisconsin-Madison; Pat Butler, U of Michigan; and Diane Selby, Ohio State U.
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Meetings took place in Pfahl Hall in the Blackwell Inn on OSU's campus.
Meetings took place in Pfahl Hall in the Blackwell Inn on OSU's campus.
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In breakout sessions, participants, representing 11 organizations, discussed “Financial and University Support.”
In breakout sessions, participants, representing 11 organizations, discussed “Financial and University Support.”
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A campus tour of The Ohio (Student) Union included an encounter with Brutus, OSU's counterpart to UI's Herky the Hawk.
A campus tour of The Ohio (Student) Union included an encounter with Brutus, OSU's counterpart to UI's Herky the Hawk.
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The atrium  in OSU's newly remodeled Main Library features a stunning, four-story display of books.
The atrium in OSU's newly remodeled Main Library features a stunning, four-story display of books.
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Topic of a third panel Sunday morning dealt wth “Effectively Communicating with Retirees.” L to R: Fred Beutler, U of Michigan; Sue Hiser, Purdue U; and Rai Goerler, Ohio State U.
Topic of a third panel Sunday morning dealt wth “Effectively Communicating with Retirees.” L to R: Fred Beutler, U of Michigan; Sue Hiser, Purdue U; and Rai Goerler, Ohio State U.
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UIRA President Nancy Williams (right) was one of two Iowa representatives. The other Iowa was UIRA Board member Ken Starck (not shown). At Nancy's left is Pat Butler of the U of Michigan.
UIRA President Nancy Williams (right) was one of two Iowa representatives. The other Iowa was UIRA Board member Ken Starck (not shown). At Nancy's left is Pat Butler of the U of Michigan.
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No Gavel, but a duck: OSU's Marie Taris (right) turns over the association's ceremonial duck to Pat Butler of the U of Michigan Retirees Association, which will be host to next year's meeting August 9-11, 2013.
No Gavel, but a duck: OSU's Marie Taris (right) turns over the association's ceremonial duck to Pat Butler of the U of Michigan Retirees Association, which will be host to next year's meeting August 9-11, 2013.
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“Innovations for the Next Decade:” AROHE's 10th Anniversary Conference

With 165 registrants representing 58 colleges and universities, the Association of Retirement Organizations in Higher Education (AROHE) held its 10th anniversary conference at the Carolina Inn on the campus of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Kenneth Starck represented Iowa retirees at the conference; his participation was made possible by the UI Provost
With 165 registrants representing 58 colleges and universities, the Association of Retirement Organizations in Higher Education (AROHE) held its 10th anniversary conference at the Carolina Inn on the campus of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Kenneth Starck represented Iowa retirees at the conference; his participation was made possible by the UI Provost
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As this campus plaque states, the U of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors for students in 1795 as the nation’s first public university. Tracing its founding roots to 1984, AROHE is a nonprofit organization with the secretariat based at the Emeriti Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
As this campus plaque states, the U of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors for students in 1795 as the nation’s first public university. Tracing its founding roots to 1984, AROHE is a nonprofit organization with the secretariat based at the Emeriti Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
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The conference—which convenes biennially—began with a reception at the home of UNC System President Thomas Ross (top right) and included remarks by AROHE
The conference—which convenes biennially—began with a reception at the home of UNC System President Thomas Ross (top right) and included remarks by AROHE
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In welcoming retirees, AROHE President Bobbie Lubker said the association is where departmental boundaries disappear.  She is retired from UNC-Chapel Hill where she held a joint appointment in the School of Education and Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine.
In welcoming retirees, AROHE President Bobbie Lubker said the association is where departmental boundaries disappear. She is retired from UNC-Chapel Hill where she held a joint appointment in the School of Education and Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine.
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AROHE Executive Director Janette C. Brown, who also is executive director of USC’s Emeriti Center, explained the purpose of AROHE: “to recognize and promote retiree organizations.”
AROHE Executive Director Janette C. Brown, who also is executive director of USC’s Emeriti Center, explained the purpose of AROHE: “to recognize and promote retiree organizations.”
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The conference featured four plenary sessions and 30 panels and workshops.
The conference featured four plenary sessions and 30 panels and workshops.
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Presenting the Paul Hadley Honorary Address at the opening plenary session was Trudier Harris, professor of English, U of Alabama, and the J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of English Emerita, UNC-Chapel Hill.  Her topic: “Outer Space, Inner Space, Creative Space: Riffing on Retirement.”
Presenting the Paul Hadley Honorary Address at the opening plenary session was Trudier Harris, professor of English, U of Alabama, and the J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of English Emerita, UNC-Chapel Hill. Her topic: “Outer Space, Inner Space, Creative Space: Riffing on Retirement.”
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Presentations covered a range of topics. One session dealt with “Best Practices in Faculty Retirement Transitions.”  At the top of the list: “Mentoring program partnering retired and new faculty.”
Presentations covered a range of topics. One session dealt with “Best Practices in Faculty Retirement Transitions.” At the top of the list: “Mentoring program partnering retired and new faculty.”
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Sources of funding? A survey of members by AROHE revealed that 44% of retiree organizations levied dues, while 42% received stipends from the Provost
Sources of funding? A survey of members by AROHE revealed that 44% of retiree organizations levied dues, while 42% received stipends from the Provost
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Attendees visited nearby North Carolina Central University, Durham, a co-host of the conference. A campus statue honors its founder, James E. Shephard (1875-1947). The school he founded became the first publicly funded liberal arts college for black students.
Attendees visited nearby North Carolina Central University, Durham, a co-host of the conference. A campus statue honors its founder, James E. Shephard (1875-1947). The school he founded became the first publicly funded liberal arts college for black students.
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“Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society” was the plenary topic of Nortin Hadler, professor of medicine, microbiology and immunoogy, UNC-Chapel. He is a critic of much of the health care prescribed for retirees.
“Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society” was the plenary topic of Nortin Hadler, professor of medicine, microbiology and immunoogy, UNC-Chapel. He is a critic of much of the health care prescribed for retirees.
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Brian Kaskie, associate professor in the U of Iowa College of Public Health and one of two Iowa professors on the program, spoke  on “Workplace Wellness and Retirement Pathways for Staff and Faculty Working in Academic Institutions.”  Based on research he conducted with colleagues, he said keys to establishing effective campus wellness and retirement programs are: campus leadership willing to allocate administrative and financial support and having trained people conduct the programs.
Brian Kaskie, associate professor in the U of Iowa College of Public Health and one of two Iowa professors on the program, spoke on “Workplace Wellness and Retirement Pathways for Staff and Faculty Working in Academic Institutions.” Based on research he conducted with colleagues, he said keys to establishing effective campus wellness and retirement programs are: campus leadership willing to allocate administrative and financial support and having trained people conduct the programs.
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U of Iowa Professor and Director of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication David Perlmutter presented a keynote address on “Retirement in Academia: Rethinking Politics, Priorities and Procedures.” He drew on an article he had written for The Chronicle of Higher Education (“In Search of a Professor
U of Iowa Professor and Director of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication David Perlmutter presented a keynote address on “Retirement in Academia: Rethinking Politics, Priorities and Procedures.” He drew on an article he had written for The Chronicle of Higher Education (“In Search of a Professor
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A tour of the North Carolina State University, Raleigh, one of the three co-hosting North Carolina institutions, culminated in a banquet at the North Carolina Museum of Art.  The museum boasts 30 works by Auguste Rodin, making it the leading repository of this sculptor
A tour of the North Carolina State University, Raleigh, one of the three co-hosting North Carolina institutions, culminated in a banquet at the North Carolina Museum of Art. The museum boasts 30 works by Auguste Rodin, making it the leading repository of this sculptor
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4/23/2014 5:02:52 AM